℗ 2015 Blue Note Records
 

Coalition

Elvin Jones

Available in 192 kHz / 24-bit, 96 kHz / 24-bit AIFF and FLAC high-resolution audio formats

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    • AIFF 96 kHz | 24-bit
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1
Shinjitu
Elvin Jones
7:38
2
Yesterdays
Elvin Jones
10:57
3
5/4 Thing
Elvin Jones
5:24
4
Ural Stradania
Elvin Jones
8:28
5
Simone
Elvin Jones
6:30
Total Playing Time    38:57
"... back to basics for Jones ... the addition of a conga player adds yet another dimension ... the conga not only complements Jones, but reinforces the drummer."
- Billboard

"... with Frank Foster and George Coleman packing a strong two tenor punch on four originals, another number finding Foster utilizing the seldom heard alto clarinet. The divergent styles work well ..."
- All About Jazz

This 1970 hard bop session from drummer Elvin Jones showcases his quintet consisting of George Coleman on tenor saxophone, Frank Foster on tenor sax and clarinet, Wilbur Little on bass and Candido Camero on percussion. Foster and Coleman contribute three of the original songs here; Jones himself wrote the fourth original tune. The fifth song is a cover of the jazz standard Yesterdays by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach.
192 kHz / 24-bit and 96 kHz / 24-bit PCM – Blue Note Records Studio Masters

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