℗ 1977 Parlophone Records Limited
 

Schumann: Cello Concerto - Bloch: Schelomo

Mstislav Rostropovich, Orchestre National de France, Leonard Bernstein

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Cello Concerto in A Minor, Op. 129  
1
I. Nicht zu schnell
Robert Schumann; Mstislav Rostropovich; Orchestre National de France; Leonard Bernstein
12:14
2
II. Langsam
Robert Schumann; Mstislav Rostropovich; Orchestre National de France; Leonard Bernstein
5:01
3
III. Sehr lebhaft
Robert Schumann; Mstislav Rostropovich; Orchestre National de France; Leonard Bernstein
8:06
4
Schelomo, B. 39
Ernest Bloch; Mstislav Rostropovich; Orchestre National de France; Leonard Bernstein
22:52
Digital Booklet
Total Playing Time    48:13
The Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129, by Robert Schumann was completed in a period of only two weeks, between 10 October and 24 October 1850, shortly after Schumann became the music director at Düsseldorf. The concerto was never played in Schumann's lifetime.

Schelomo: Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra was the final work of composer Ernest Bloch’s “Jewish Cycle.” Schelomo, which was written in 1915 to 1916, premiered on May 3, 1917, played by cellist Hans Kindler.

That the cello's repertoire has been so wonderfully enriched during the 20th century is due largely to Mstislav Rostropovich, the most influential cellist of his time, a champion of liberty, and also a noted conductor and pianist. Born In Baku on 27 March 1927 to a pianist mother and a cello-playing father who had studied with Pablo Casals, 'Slava' received early paternal grounding in his chosen instrument.

Rostropovich was closely associated with EMI Classics (now Warner Classics) for more than 50 years, having made 100 recordings with the company between 1954 and his death in 2007, just a month after celebrations for his 80th birthday at the Kremlin.
96 kHz / 24-bit PCM – Warner Classics Studio Masters

Tracks 1-4 – contains high-resolution digital transfers of material originating from an analogue master source

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