℗ 2019 Sub Pop Records
 

Years to Burn

Calexico, Iron & Wine

Available in MQA and 96 kHz / 24-bit AIFF, FLAC high resolution audio formats

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1
What Heaven's Left
Calexico; Iron & Wine
4:52
2
Midnight Sun
Calexico; Iron & Wine
4:14
3
Father Mountain
Calexico; Iron & Wine
2:54
4
Outside El Paso
Calexico; Iron & Wine
1:51
5
Follow the Water
Calexico; Iron & Wine
3:45
6
The Bitter Suite (Pájaro / Evil Eye / Tennessee Train)
Calexico; Iron & Wine
8:15
7
Years to Burn
Calexico; Iron & Wine
3:07
8
In Your Own Time
Calexico; Iron & Wine
3:09
Total Playing Time    32:07
Calexico and Iron & Wine first made an artistic connection with In the Reins, the 2005 EP that brought Sam Beam, Joey Burns and John Convertino together. The acclaimed collaboration introduced both acts to wider audiences and broadened Beam’s artistic horizons, but it was the shared experience of touring together in the tradition of Bob Dylan’s “Rolling Thunder Revue” that cemented their bond. Their metaphorical roads diverged in the years that followed, but they kept in touch and cross-pollinated where they could. But although they often talked about rekindling their collaboration in the studio and on the stage, it wasn’t until last year that their schedules aligned.

Years to Burn can’t help but be different from In the Reins. Back then, Calexico entered the studio with a long list of previous collaborations (first in Giant Sand, then backing the likes of Victoria Williams and Richard Buckner) and the knowledge that they loved Sam’s voice and his songs, but wondering if his material was so complete and self-contained that it lacked a way in, so hushed and delicate that it might be overwhelmed. For his part, Beam had been intimidated by their virtuosic playing and their deep comfort in an encyclopedic array of styles. “In my mind, I was a guy who knew three chords and recorded in a closet,” Sam says. “They were playing big stages and were superb musicians.”

Those fears were dispelled quickly. Calexico was bowled over by Beam’s many talents: “The arranging, the writing, his sense of rhythm, the quality of his vocals—and then there’s the experimental side of Sam,” Joey says. “They were the perfect band at the perfect time for me,” Sam adds. “I loved all their different sounds. They’re musical anthropologists, not regurgitating but absorbing what they discover.” Nearly 15 years on, “coming back to the project has to do with acknowledging how much impact the first record had for me in my life.”

Beam, Burns and Convertino reconvened in Nashville for four days of recording in December 2018. Nobody was keen to retread old ground. The change of venue—from Calexico’s home base of Tucson, where In the Reins was tracked—was one part of the effort. Together with Niehaus, veteran Calexico trumpet player Jacob Valenzuela and frequent Beam cohorts Rob Burger (Tin Hat Trio) on piano and Sebastian Steinberg (Soul Coughing, Fiona Apple) on bass, they settled in at the Sound Emporium, a fabled studio founded in the sixties by Cowboy Jack Clement and the site of countless landmark sessions in country and rock over the ensuing decades.
96 kHz / 24-bit PCM – Sub Pop Records Studio Masters

Tracks 1-8 – contains material which utilizes a limited amount of the available bandwidth

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