℗ 2011 Groupe Analekta
 

Brillance: Ragtime to Modernism

Mathieu Gaulin, Jacynthe Riverin

Available in 88.2 kHz / 24-bit AIFF, FLAC high resolution audio formats
  • Select Format
    • AIFF 88.2 kHz | 24-bit
    • FLAC 88.2 kHz | 24-bit
Add to cart
discounted price
 
1.1
The Devil’s Rag
Jean Matitia; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
4:16
Sonata in C sharp  
1.2
I. Très modéré – Expressif
Fernande Breilh-Decruck; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
4:43
1.3
II. Andante
Fernande Breilh-Decruck; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
2:46
1.4
III. Fileuse
Fernande Breilh-Decruck; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
1:50
1.5
IV. Nocturne et final
Fernande Breilh-Decruck; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
4:32
Sonata, Op.19  
1.6
I. With vigor
Paul Creston; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
4:50
1.7
II. With tranquility
Paul Creston; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
4:34
1.8
III. With gaiety
Paul Creston; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
3:48
Sonata  
1.9
I. Two-Part Invention
William Albright; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
3:58
1.10
II. La Follia nuova - a lament for George Cacioppo
William Albright; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
7:18
1.11
III. Scherzo "Will o' the wisp"
William Albright; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
1:55
1.12
IV.Recitative
William Albright; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
1:24
1.13
V. Mad dance
William Albright; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
2:33
Brillance  
1.14
I. Déclamé
Ida Gotkovsky; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
1:57
1.15
II. Désinvolte
Ida Gotkovsky; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
1:40
1.16
III. Dolcissimo
Ida Gotkovsky; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
2:48
1.17
IV. Final
Ida Gotkovsky; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
2:38
1.18
Valse Vanité
Rudy Wiedoeft; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
3:45
Klonos  
1.19
I. Allegro
Piet Swerts; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
1:58
1.20
II. Andante moderato
Piet Swerts; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
1:41
1.21
III. Allegro
Piet Swerts; Mathieu Gaulin; Jacynthe Riverin
2:22
Total Playing Time    67:16
The son of a wind instrument maker, Adolphe Sax (1814-1894) began making his own clarinets, completing one with 24 keys before the age of 20. After perfecting valved bugles – soon renamed Sax’s horns or saxhorns in his honour – he focused on the instrument which was to make him famous: the saxophone. As he explained in his patent in 1846, he wished to create “an instrument, which by the character of its voice can be reconciled with stringed instruments, but which possesses more force and intensity than the strings.” Unfortunately, the saxophone arrived too late in the history of music to succeed in establishing a place for itself in classical orchestras, whose standard configuration was already more or less fixed in the 19th century. Only in the 1920s did the instrument attain its hour of glory. We might be tempted to believe that jazz stirred up the saxophone’s popularity. We should rather reword the equation: its popularity convinced musicians in jazz orchestras to include it in their ranks. Able to adopt a brilliant – one could even say athletic – register, as well as to dissolve in emotion resembling that of the human voice, the saxophone has turned out to be one of the most versatile of wind instruments. Essential elements of its palette include the production of percussive sounds (slap-tongue), continuous airflow, multiphonics and varied attack modes. Alternately tender or playful, it surprises and seduces. Its power blends marvellously with that of the piano. The latter doesn’t just play a supporting role here but is offered all the freedom necessary for a dialogue with an astonishingly complementary partner. This recording by the Gaulin-Riverin Duo proves it beyond a doubt by offering an eclectic panorama of pieces that European and American composers have dedicated to such duets throughout the 20th century.
88.2 kHz / 24-bit PCM – Analekta Studio Masters

For Your Consideration | More ▸

Offers & New Releases

exclusive benefits for mailing list members

Subscribe Now

What is High-Resolution Audio?

High-resolution audio offers the highest-fidelity available, far surpassing the sound quality of traditional CDs. When you listen to music on a CD or tracks purchased via consumer services such as iTunes, you are hearing a low-resolution version of what was actually recorded and mastered in the studio. ProStudioMasters offers the original studio masters — exactly as the artist, producers and sound engineers mastered them — for download, directly to you.

What do I need for playback?

You may need additional software / hardware to take full advantage of the higher 24-bit high-res audio formats, but any music lover that has heard 16-bit vs 24-bit will tell you it's worth it!

Software for Mac OS X

Software for Windows

Hardware Suggestions