℗ 2015 Dacapo Records
 

Carl Nielsen: Violin Concerto - Flute Concerto - Clarinet Concerto

Nikolaj Znaider, Robert Langevin, Anthony McGill, New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert

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Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 33  
1
I. Prelude. Largo - Allegro cavallerésco
Carl Nielsen; Nikolaj Znaider; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
18:43
2
IIa. Poco adagio -
Carl Nielsen; Nikolaj Znaider; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
6:19
3
IIb. Rondo. Allegretto scherzando
Carl Nielsen; Nikolaj Znaider; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
10:06
Concerto for Flute and Orchestra  
4
I. Allegro moderato
Carl Nielsen; Robert Langevin; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
10:55
5
II. Allegretto, un poco
Carl Nielsen; Robert Langevin; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
7:21
Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, Op. 57  
6
Allegretto un poco -
Carl Nielsen; Anthony McGill; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
8:08
7
Poco adagio -
Carl Nielsen; Anthony McGill; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
4:49
8
Allegro non troppo - Adagio - Allegro vivace
Carl Nielsen; Anthony McGill; New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert
10:55
Digital Booklet
Total Playing Time    77:16
This concert recording by the New York Philharmonic and Alan Gilbert concludes the acclaimed and ambitious Nielsen Project, a multi-season survey of Carl Nielsen's symphonies and concertos that yielded a series of live albums. Nielsen's three solo concertos for violin, flute and clarinet are highly characteristic and expressive works that show the composer's development as he increasingly distanced himself from the classical conventions of the day. In the Violin Concerto, recorded with Nikolaj Znaider in 2011, there is a personal empathy with the solo instrument because Nielsen was originally a violinist himself. Robert Langevin is the soloist on the Flute Concerto, also from a 2011 concert, while principal clarinet Anthony McGill makes his Philharmonic debut on the Clarinet Concerto, recorded in January 2015.

“I think it’s really full-blooded, passionate, dramatic and ultimately human music. That’s what I’m going for and that’s what the Philharmonic is good at ... Nielsen’s music is based on classic traditions, but it’s just so Danish! Strong, beautiful and independent."
- Alan Gilbert
192 kHz / 24-bit, 96 kHz / 24-bit PCM – Dacapo SACD Studio Masters

Recorded at Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center, New York City, 10–13 October 2012 (Violin and Flute Concertos) and 7–10 & 13 January 2015 (Clarinet Concerto)
Recording producers: Preben Iwan and Mats Engström
Sound engineer, mix and mastering: Preben Iwan

Recorded in the DXD audio format (Digital eXtreme Definition) 352.8kHz / 32-bit
Live monitoring on MK Sound speakers
Microphones main array: Decca Tree with outriggers: 5x DPA 4006TL
Converters & Preamps: DAD AX24
DAW system: Pyramix with Smart AV Tango controller
Mastering monitored on B&W 802 Diamond speakers
Liner notes: Jens Cornelius
English translation of the liner notes: James Manley Proofreader: Svend Ravnkilde
Photos pp 9, 11, 13, 15, and 26 © Chris Lee
Graphic design: Denise Burt, Elevator ­Design
Publisher: The Carl Nielsen Edition – Edition Wilhelm Hansen AS

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